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Lewis : decanto

decanto, dēcanto, āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. (in the class. per. freq. in Cic.; elsewh. rare). To sing a thing off, to repeat in a singing manner (v. cano and canto). Usually with the secondary idea of something trite, worn out, absurd; to repeat often, to say over and over again ( = semper repetere, in ore habere; cf. cantilena): nec mihi opus est Graeco aliquo doctore, qui mihi pervulgata praecepta decantet, Cic. de Or. 2, 18, 75: causas, id. ib. 2, 32, 140; id. Fin. 4, 4, 10; id. Att. 13, 34; Quint. 12, 8, 3; Hor. Ep. 1, 1, 64 al.

Without this unfavorable idea: miserabiles elegos, Hor. Od. 1, 33, 3: Ἅλωσιν Ilii in scenico habitu, to recite, rehearse, * Suet. Ner. 38: tribus, to proclaim, Luc. 5, 394.

Esp., to repeat as a charm, and hence to bewitch, enchant, charm: nullo decantatus carmine, App. M. 3, p. 138, 35: verbis et amplexibus aliquem, id. ib. 5, p. 165, 6; id. ib. 3, p. 137, 12; Vulg. Isa. 54, 1 al.

Intr. (Acc. to de, no. II. 2. b.) To leave off singing: jam decantaverant ( = cantare, deplorare desierant), had given over lamenting, Cic. Tusc. 3, 22, 53.

To play (upon an instrument): decantandi jus tibicinibus ademit, Aur. Vict. Vir. Illust. 34, 1.