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Lewis : eicio

eicio ēĭcĭo (or ejicio), jēci, jectum, 3 (eicit, dissyl., Lucr. 3, 877; 4, 1272), v. a. jacio, to cast, thrust, or drive out; to eject, expel (class.). Lit. In gen.: aliquem e senatu, Cic. de Sen. 12 fin.; Liv. 43, 15; cf.: ex oppido, Caes. B. C. 1, 30, 3: de senatu, Liv. 40, 51; 41, 26: de collegio, Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 5: a suis diis penatibus, id. Quint. 26, 83: finibus, Sall. J. 14, 8: domo, Plaut. As. 1, 3, 9; Caes. B. G. 4, 7, 3; cf.: aedibus foras, Plaut. As. 1, 2, 1: omnes amasios foras, id. Truc. 3, 1, 14: aliquem, Cic. Rep. 1, 42; id. Mil. 38 fin.; Caes. B. G. 7, 4, 4; id. B. C. 2, 19 fin.: aliquem in exsilium, Cic. Cat. 2, 7; cf.: o fortunatum rem publicam, si hanc sentinam hujus urbis ejecerit, id. ib. 2, 4, 7; so, eicere alone, Nep. Lys. 1, 5 et saep.; cf. of a rider, to throw, Verg. A. 10, 894: vitem ex se, to shoot forth, Varr. R. R. 1, 31, 3: sanguinem, to throw up, to vomit, Plin. 24, 5, 10, § 15; cf. Cic. Fam. 14, 7; Cels. 1, 3; Quint. 11, 3, 27.—Absol. (sc. fetum), to miscarry, Dig. 9, 2, 27, § 22; cf. Lucr. 4, 1272: linguam, to thrust out, Cic. de Or. 2, 66, 266: cervicem, to dislocate (luxare), Veg. Vet. 3, 41, 1; cf. armum, id. ib. 2, 45, 7; Verg. A. 10, 984: oculum, Vulg. Marc. 9, 46: coxas, Hyg. Fab. 57: voces pectore ab imo, to utter, Lucr. 3, 58: fauces, e quibus eici vocem et fundi videmus, Cic. Tusc. 2, 24, 57 (al. elicere, v. elicio).

Se (ex aliquo loco), to rush out, sally forth, Caes. B. G. 4, 15, 1; 5, 15, 3; 5, 21, 5; id. B. C. 3, 16, 3; Cic. Cat. 1, 12 fin. et saep.; cf.: sese in terram e navi, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 35: se in agros, Liv. 6, 3 (also in Caes. B. G. 5, 19, 2, inst. of the vulg. reading effunderet): se foras, id. 1, 40 fin. — In partic., as a naut. t. t., to drive a ship to land. To bring to land: naves, Caes. B. C. 3, 25, 4; cf.: navem in terram, id. ib. 3, 28, 5: naves ad Chium, Liv. 44, 28.—Far more freq., To run aground, cast ashore; to strand, wreck. Of vessels, etc.: scapham, Plaut. Rud. 1, 2, 80 sq. (v. the passage in connection): naves in litore, Caes. B. G. 5, 10, 2; cf.: naves in litora, Liv. 29, 18: classem ad Baleares insulas, id. 23, 34 fin.: naves apud insulas, Tac. A. 2, 24 et saep.

Of persons, esp. in perf. part. pass., wrecked, Plaut. Rud. 2, 7, 4; 2, 3, 78; 1, 5, 14; Ter. And. 1, 3, 18; 5, 4, 20; Cic. Rosc. Am. 26, 72; Verg. A. 4, 373; Ov. M. 13, 536; id. H. 7, 89 et saep.—Hence, Meton. (causa pro effectu): ejectus homo, a broken, ruined man, Cic. Quint. 19 fin. (Acc. to others, an outcast, acc. to II. B.) Trop. In gen., to expel: curam ex animo, Plaut. Cas. prol. 23; cf. Cic. Rosc. Am. 19, 53; Liv. 28, 28; 30, 13: mollitiem animi, Ter. Eun. 2, 1, 16: superstitionis stirpes, Cic. Div. 2, 72.—Poet.: ejectus die, i. e. deprived of light, Stat. Th. 4, 617.

With se: voluptates subito se nonnumquam profundunt atque eiciunt universae, etc., rush forth, break forth or out, Cic. Cael. 31, 75.

In partic., like ἐκβάλλειν, to reject disapprovingly: Cynicorum ratio tota est eicienda, Cic. Off. 1, 41, 148; cf. id. Clu. 31, 86; id. Fin. 5, 8, 23 (in both passages with explodere), id. de Or. 1, 32, 146; id. Att. 2, 24, 2.—Esp. of players, public speakers, etc., to hiss or hoot off, Cic. de Or. 3, 50 fin.; Auct. Her. 4, 47 (with deridere); cf.: cantorum ipsorum vocibus eiciebatur, Cic. Sest. 55, 118.