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Lewis : obduco

obduco, obdūco, xi, ctum (inf. perf. sync. obduxe, Arg. ad Plaut. Merc. 7), 3, v. a., to lead or draw before, lead or conduct against or towards, to draw or bring forward or around, draw over (class. and very freq.; syn.: obtendo, obtego). Lit.: ad oppidum exercitum, Plaut. Ps. 2, 1, 13: vim Gallicam obduc contra in acie, Att. ap. Non. 224, 13: Curium, Cic. Att. 1, 1, 2: ab utroque latere collis transversam fossam obduxit, drew forward, drew, made, or extended a trench, Caes. B. G. 2, 8: vela, Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 21: vestem, to draw on or over, Tac. A. 4, 70; Curt. 6, 5, 27: seram, to draw, close, fasten, Prop. 5, 5, 48: callum, to draw over, Cic. Fam. 9, 2, 3.

Transf. To cover by drawing over; to cover over, overspread, surround, envelop: trunci obducuntur libro, aut cortice, Cic. N. D. 2, 47, 120: operimento, id. Leg. 2, 22, 56; Verg. E. 1, 49: vultus, of the sun, Ov. M. 2, 330: caput, Luc. 9, 109: semina cortice, Plin. 19, 7, 36, § 119: obducta cicatrix, a closed, healed scar, Cic. Agr. 3, 2, 4; Curt. 8, 10, 31: obductā nocte, overcast, cloudy, dark, Nep. Hann. 5, 2; Curt. 8, 13, 25.

To close, shut up (poet.): obducta penetralia Phoebi, Luc. 5, 67: fores, Sen. Herc. Oet. 1548. mors oculos coepit obducere, Petr. S. 19.

To draw in, drink down, swallow: venenum, Cic. Tusc. 1, 40, 96: potionem, Sen. Prov. 3, 12: pultarium mulsi, to drink up, Petr. 42.

To swallow up, overwhelm: uti eos, eum exercitum, eos hostes, eosque homines, urbes agrosque eorum ... obducatis (an imprecation to the gods below), Macr. S. 3, 9, 10.

To contract, wrinkle, knit the brow: obductā solvatur fronte senectus, Hor. Epod. 13, 5: frontem, Juv. 9, 2: vultum, Sen. Cons. ad Marc. 1, 5.

To injure, harm (late Lat.): stomachum, Cael. Aur. Tard. 3, 2, 28.

To bring home in opposition or rivalry to another: eum putat uxor sibi Obduxe scortum, Plaut. Merc. Arg. 1, 7.

Trop. To draw or spread over: obsidionem, Enn. ap. Paul. ex Fest. p. 198 Müll. (Trag. v. 11 Vahl.): clarissimis rebus tenebras obducere, i. e. to darken, obscure, Cic. Ac. 2, 6, 16: paulatim tenebris sese obducentibus, Plin. 11, 37, 54, § 143.

Transf. To cover, conceal: obductus verbis dolor, Verg. A. 10, 64: obductos rescindere luctus, Ov. M. 12, 543: rei publicae obducere cicatricem, Cic. Leg. Agr. 3, 2, 4.

Qs., to draw out, i. e. to pass, spend time: itaque obduxi posterum diem, Cic. Att. 16, 6, 1.