Close Window

Lewis : Olympus

Olympus Ŏlympus and -pos (anciently written Olĭmpus), i, m., = Ὄλυμπος . The name of several mountains, the most celebrated of which is one on the borders of Macedonia and Thessaly (now Lacha), of great height, and consequently regarded as the seat of the gods, Mel. 2, 3, 2; 4, 8, 15: Musae quae pedibus magnum pulsatis Olimpum, Enn. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 20 Müll.: his diis Helicona atque Olympon attribuerunt homines, Varr. R. R. 3, 16, 7: frondosus, Verg. G. 1, 282: opacus, Hor. C. 3, 4, 52: nubes excedit Olympus, Luc. 2, 271.

Transf., poet. for heaven: caelum dicunt Graeci Olympum, Varr. L. L. 7, § 20; Verg. E. 6, 86: longus Olympus, the distant heavens, id. G. 3, 223: annuit (Juppiter) et totum nutu tremefecit Olympum, id. A. 9, 106: stelliger, Sen. Herc. Oet. 1907.—Hence, Ŏlympĭădes, um, f., the Muses (perh. only acc. to the foll. remark): caelum dicunt Graeci Olympum montem in Macedoniā omnes, a quo potius puto Musas dictas Olympiadas, Varr. L. L. 7, § 20.

Of other mountains. In Bithynia, Plin. 5, 32, 43, § 148.

In Mysia, Plin. 5, 32, 40, § 142.

In Galatia, Liv. 38, 18, 15; 38, 20, 2.

In Lycia, Plin. 21, 6, 17, § 31.

In Ionia, Plin. 5, 29, 31, § 118.

In Peloponnesus, Serv. ad Verg. A. 8, 352.