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Lewis : ovo

ovo, ŏvo, ātum (first pers. pres. indic. and perf. forms not in use: ovet, Stat. Sil. 4, 1, 8: ovaret, id. Th. 1, 153: ovandi, Suet. Claud. 1; Gell. 5, 6: ovaturus, Sol. 45), 1, v. defect. n. [cf. Sanscr. root u-, avate, to roar; Gr. αὔω, ἀϝυω, to shout], to exult, rejoice. In gen. (mostly poet.): ovantes Horatium accipiunt, Liv. 1, 25: laetus ovat nunc laude virum, Val. Fl. 4, 342.—Of inanim. subjects: currus ovantes, Prop. 3, 7 (4, 8), 53: ovat Africus, rages, Val. Fl. 2, 506.

In partic., to celebrate or keep an ovation, to triumph in an ovation (v. ovatio; freq. and class.): ovantem in Capitolium ascendere, Cic. de Or. 2, 47, 195: ovans urbem ingrederetur, Liv. 5, 31: ovans triumphavit, made his triumphal entry on foot, Vell. 2, 96, 3; Suet. Tib. 9: ovatum aurum, brought in in triumph, taken as spoil, Pers. 2, 55. —Hence, P. a.: ŏvans, antis, exulting, joyful, triumphant: socii comitentur ovantes, Verg. G. 1, 346; cf.: ovantes gutture corvi, i. e. singing, uttering exultant cries, id. ib. 1, 423; id. A. 3, 189; 4, 543.—Transf., of things: prosequar et currus utroque ab litore ovantes, Prop. 3, 9 (4, 8), 53: lyra, Stat. S. 1, 2, 249: patria, Juv. 8, 28.—Hence, ŏvanter, adv., exultingly (post-class.): ovanter accurrit, Tert. adv. Val. 28.