Close Window

Lewis : rudens

rudens, rŭdens, entis (gen. plur. rudentium, Vitr. 10, 19; Prud. adv. Symm. praef. 2; abl. rudenti, Vitr. 10, 2), m. (fem., Plaut. Rud. 4, 3, 1) [etym. unknown; acc. to the ancients from rudo, on account of the rattling; v. Non. p. 51], a rope, line, cord (very freq. and class.; syn.: restis, funis). Usu., a rope, line, belonging to the standing or running rigging of a ship; a stay, halyard, sheet, etc.; plur. collect., the rigging, cordage: clamor tonitruum et rudentum sibilus, Pac. ap. Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 2, 1; cf. Varr. L. L. 5, § 7 Müll. N. cr.; and Serv. Verg. A. 1, 87 (Trag. Rel. p. 100 Rib.); imitated by Vergil: clamorque virum stridorque rudentum, Verg. A. 1, 87; Plaut. Rud. 4, 3, 1; 76; 92; Cic. Div. 1, 56, 127; Quint. 10, 7, 23; Verg. A. 3, 267; 682; 10, 229; Hor. Epod. 10, 5; Ov. M. 3, 616; 11, 474; 495 et saep.

Hence, Rudens, the title of a comedy by Plautus.— Trop.: rudentem explicavit immensum, spun a long yarn, unfolded a prodigious series of facts, Amm. 29, 1, 6. —Prov.: rudentibus apta fortuna, a very uncertain fortune, Cic. Tusc. 5, 14, 40.

The rope of an engine of war, Vitr. 10, 17 sq.