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Lewis : salum

salum, sălum, i, n. (masc. collat. form, corresp. to the Gr. acc., undantem salum, Enn. ap. Non. 223, 24, or Trag. v. 226 Vahl.), = σάλος, the open sea, the high sea, the main, the deep; opp. to the sea near the coast or in a port (occurring only in sing., and mostly in the acc. and abl.). Lit. (rare but class.), Cic. Caecin. 30, 88: in salum nave evectus, Liv. 29, 14: paucas (naves) ante portum in salo habiturum, id. 37, 10: pars (classis) in salo ad ostium portūs in ancoris stetit, id. 37, 13 (cf. the Gr. ἐν σάλὡ στῆναι, to lie at anchor in the open sea); so, in salo stare, id. 37, 16; 44, 12: procul ab insulā in salo navem tenere ancoris, Nep. Them. 8.

Transf. In gen., the sea (poet.): rapidum salum tulistis truculentaque pelagi, Cat. 63, 16; Prop. 1, 6, 2; 1, 15, 12; 3, 7 (4, 6), 40; Verg. A. 1, 537; 2, 209; Hor. Epod. 17, 55; Ov. Am. 2, 11, 24 al.: rubrum, Prop. 3, 13 (4, 12), 6.—* Like σάλος, sea-sickness: tirones salo nauseāque confecti, Caes. B. C. 3, 28.—* The stream, current of a river: (amnis) saevit majore salo, Stat. Th. 10, 867.

The color of the sea, Mart. Cap. 1, §§ 16 and 17.

Trop., a sea of thought, agitation, trouble, etc.: tam aerumnoso navigare salo, Cic. poët. Tusc. 3, 28, 67: cum in isto cogitationis salo fluctuarem, App. M. 4 init.: mentis (with dissensio cogitationum), id. ib. 9, p. 225, 30.