Close Window

Lewis : cadaver

cadaver, cădāver, ĕris, n. cado, I. B. 2.; cf. Isid. Orig. 11, 2, 35, and the Gr. πτῶμα, from πίπτω . Lit., a dead body of man or brute, a corpse, carcass (class.). Of man: taetra cadavera, Lucr. 2, 415; 3, 719; 4, 682; 6, 1154; 6, 1273: aqua cadaveribus inquinata, Cic. Tusc. 5, 34, 97.—Freq. of the bodies of slaves, criminals, etc., Cic. Mil. 13, 33; Hor. S. 1, 8, 8; 2, 5, 85.—Of the dead bodies of those who fell in war, Caes. B. G. 7, 77; Sall. C. 61, 4; 61, 8; id. J. 101 fin.; Flor. 2, 6, 18; 3, 2, 85; Val. Max. 7, 6, 5.—Of the body of Caligula, Suet. Calig. 59: semiustum, id. Dom. 15 al.: informe, Verg. A. 8, 264.—Esp., as med. t. t. for a corpse: recentia, Plin. 2, 103, 106, § 233; 11, 37, 70, § 184; Val. Max. 9, 2, ext. 10; Sen. Contr. 10, 34.

Of brutes: aggerat ipsis In stabulis turpi dilapsa cadavera tabo, Verg. G. 3, 557.—Hence, as a term of reproach of a despised, worthless man, a carcass: ab hoc ejecto cadavere quidquam mihi aut opis aut ornamenti expetebam? Cic. Pis. 9, 19; 33, 82.—* Meton., the remains, ruins of desolated towns: tot oppidŭm cadavera, Sulp. ap. Cic. Fam. 4, 5, 4.