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Lewis : capitulum

capitulum, căpĭtŭlum, i, n. dim. caput. Lit., a small head, of man or beast: operto capitulo bibere, Plaut. Curc. 2, 3, 14.

Hence, in the lang. of comedy, for a man, Plaut. As. 2, 4, 89; and as a term of endearment: o capitulum lepidissimum, most charming creature, Ter. Eun. 3, 3, 25: haedi, Cels. 2, 22.

Of plants: caepae, Col. 11, 3, 15: sarmenti, id. 3, 77, 4: torcularii, Cato, R. R. 18, 4 al. (perh. also ramulorum, Plin. 24, 19, 113, § 173; 27, 5, 20, § 37; cf. capitellum).

Transf. In architecture. The capital or chapiter of a column, Vitr. 3, 3; 4, 1; Plin. 36, 23, 56, § 178 sq.

The capital of a triglyph, Vitr. 4, 3, 8.

The cross-beam of warlike engines, Vitr. 1, 1; 10, 17.

In late Lat., a covering for the head of females, Isid. Orig. 19, 31, 3; cf. Varr. ap. Non. p. 542, 30.

Also late Lat., a prominent part or division of a writing, a chapter, section, Tert. adv. Jud. 9, 19; Hier. in Ezech. c. 47 fin.A section of a law, Cod. Just. 5, 37, 28.

The raising of recruits (as an office), Cod. Th. 11, 16, 15.