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Lewis : cibarius

cibarius, cĭbārĭus, a, um, adj. cibus, pertaining to or suitable for food (class.): res, Plaut. Capt. 4, 3, 1: leges, i. e. sumptuary laws, laws restraining luxury, Cato ap. Macr. S. 2, 13: uva, suitable only for eating, not for wine, Plin. 14, 3, 4, § 37; cf.: uva vilitatis cibariae, id. 14, 2, 4, § 35.

Subst.: cĭbārĭa, ōrum, n., food, nutriment, victuals, provisions, fare, ration, fodder (in the jurists a more restricted idea than alimenta, which comprises every thing necessary for sustaining life, Dig. 34, 1, 6; cf. ib. 34, 1, 12; 34, 1, 15; and in gen. the whole tit. 1: de alimentis vel cibariis legatis), Plaut. Truc. 5, 43; Cato, R. R. 56; Col. 12, 14; Suet. Tib. 46: congerere, Hor. S. 1, 1, 32; Dig. l. l. al.—Of soldiers, Varr. L. L. 5, § 90 Müll.; Caes. B. G. 1, 5; 3, 18; Nep. Eum. 8, 7; cf. Liv. 21, 49, 8; Cic. Tusc. 2, 16, 37; Quint. 5, 13, 17; Suet. Galb. 7 al.—Of the provincial magistrates, corn allowed to deputies: cibaria praefecti, Cic. Att. 6, 3, 6; id. Verr. 2, 3, 30, § 72; 2, 3, 93, §§ 216 and 217; id. Fam. 5, 20, 9.—Of cattle, Cato. R. R. 60; Varr. R. R. 2, 9, 6; 3, 16, 4; Cic. Rosc. Am. 20, 56; Col. 4, 8, 5 al. —In sing., Sen. Ben. 3, 21, 2.

Meton. (in accordance with the fare given to servants), ordinary, common: panis, black bread, Cic. Tusc. 5, 34, 97 (cf. Isid. Orig. 20, 2, 15: panis cibarius est, qui ad cibum servis datur, nec delicatus); so subst.: cĭbā-rĭum, ii, n., also called cibarium secundarium, the coarser meal which remains after the fine wheat flour, shorts, Plin. 18, 9, 20, § 87: vinum, Varr. ap. Non. p. 93, 14: oleum, Col. 12. 50, 18 sq.: sapor, id. 12, 11, 2 Schneid.

Trop.: cibarius Aristoxenus, i. e. an ordinary musician, Varr. ap. Non. p. 93, 15.