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Lewis : cognitor

cognitor, cognĭtor, ōris, m. cognosco, a judic. t. t. Lit., one who has made himself familiar with a case in law; hence, An advocate, attorney (acting in the name of the parties, who had previously appeared before the tribunal: cognitor est, qui litem alterius suscipit coram ab eo, cui datus est, Paul. ex Fest. p. 57, 9 Müll.; cf. Ascon. Cic. Div. in Caecil. 4, 11; Gai Inst. 4, 97; and v. advocatus), Cic. Div. in Caecil. 4, 11, id. Verr. 2, 2, 43, § 106 sq.; 2, 3, 34, § 78; 2, 3, 60, § 137; id. Caecin. 5, 14; id. Rosc. Com. 11, 32; 18, 53; * Quint. 3, 6, 71 al.

A judge, = quaesitor, Cod. Th. 9, 27, 5; 10, 10, 20; Symm. Ep. 9, 39 al.

In gen., a defender, protector: hoc (Caesare) auctore et cognitore hujusce sententiae, Cic. Cat. 4, 5, 9; Auct. Harusp. 21, 45; Liv. 39, 5, 2; Hor. S. 2, 5, 38 al.: Liber dithyramborum cognitor, Front. Eloqu. p. 217.

A witness, who testifies that he knows a person, a voucher, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 65, § 167 sq.; cf. id. ib. § 168; 2, 1, 5, § 13.